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Central Floridian - photographer, illustrator, and (occasionally) very bad writer. This blog is mostly for my drawings and non-photographic-related creative-ish stuff.

omgthatdress:

Fan

1830s

The Victoria & Albert Museum

Love this! Rather puts some ideas in my head for possible future projects.

— 2 years ago with 229 notes
#fan  #accessory  #women  #1830s 
A GPOY. Because my friend Anna made me this cowl scarf it arrived today and I just have to brag on her because it’s gorgeous and cooshy and squishable and warm and perfect for my Philadelphia trip next month and it makes me happy thus the GPOY picture post.
*gasp for breath*
She has an Etsy shop where she sells other cowls, go and check them out.

A GPOY. Because my friend Anna made me this cowl scarf it arrived today and I just have to brag on her because it’s gorgeous and cooshy and squishable and warm and perfect for my Philadelphia trip next month and it makes me happy thus the GPOY picture post.

*gasp for breath*

She has an Etsy shop where she sells other cowls, go and check them out.

— 2 years ago with 7 notes
#gpoy  #me  #self portrait  #cowl  #scarf  #accessory 
I made a box as one of the finishing touches for the restoration of J & H Tracy parasol. I had a few photos of original nineteenth-century parasol boxes to use as reference (Alas, I’ve only seen three or four in the four or five years I’ve researched, their survival rate is vanishingly small.) and constructed the box using framing mat cardboard. After gluing the pieces together, the edges and corners were finished with strips of paper, to give it a neat, completed appearance. I lined the interior with pale pink tissue paper (it’s not really visible here, unfortunately.) as a nod to the pale-colored papers that became popular towards the end of the 1860s. 
I also used that Jay’s label I posted a while back.  I had to change the street numbers as they weren’t correct for the store for the period the parasol was made, and I had to correct a silly punctuation mistake I made.

I made a box as one of the finishing touches for the restoration of J & H Tracy parasol. I had a few photos of original nineteenth-century parasol boxes to use as reference (Alas, I’ve only seen three or four in the four or five years I’ve researched, their survival rate is vanishingly small.) and constructed the box using framing mat cardboard. After gluing the pieces together, the edges and corners were finished with strips of paper, to give it a neat, completed appearance. I lined the interior with pale pink tissue paper (it’s not really visible here, unfortunately.) as a nod to the pale-colored papers that became popular towards the end of the 1860s. 

I also used that Jay’s label I posted a while back.  I had to change the street numbers as they weren’t correct for the store for the period the parasol was made, and I had to correct a silly punctuation mistake I made.

— 3 years ago with 7 notes
#1869-1873  #Accessory  #J & H Tracy  #Parasol  #antique  #box  #graphic design  #label  #vintage  #restoration  #parasol restoration 

Carriage Parasol
J & H Tracy Co.
Ca 1869-1873
Restoration, early 2010-June 2011, by Brandon McKinney

Carriage Parasol

J & H Tracy Co.

Ca 1869-1873

Restoration, early 2010-June 2011, by Brandon McKinney

— 3 years ago with 3 notes
#parasol  #carriage parasol  #Victorian  #antique  #vintage  #1869-1873  #1870s  #fashion  #accessory  #fashion accessory 

Carriage Parasol

J. & H. Tracy Co.

Ca 1869-1873

Restoration, 2010 - June 2011 by Brandon McKinney.

— 3 years ago with 1 note
#1870s  #J & H Tracy  #accessory  #antique  #carriage parasol  #fashion  #fashion accessory  #parasol  #victorian  #vintage  #restoration 

Carriage Parasols.
Left: 1840-1850.
Right, ca. 1850. Att. to W. & J. Sangster, possibly exhibited at the Great Exhibition of 1851.
Victoria and Albert Museum

Both examples have folding ivory handles, and whalebone (baleen) ribs. Both covers are of fine silk. Both also display hand-knotted silk fringes and polychrome silk embroidery. The example on the right, however, sports a marquise hinge - which is a brass-cupped hinge that the slide (from which the struts to the ribs radiate out) is pushed above and thence the whole cover can be pivoted to accommodate the angle of the sun.

Carriage Parasols.

Left: 1840-1850.

Right, ca. 1850. Att. to W. & J. Sangster, possibly exhibited at the Great Exhibition of 1851.

Victoria and Albert Museum

Both examples have folding ivory handles, and whalebone (baleen) ribs. Both covers are of fine silk. Both also display hand-knotted silk fringes and polychrome silk embroidery. The example on the right, however, sports a marquise hinge - which is a brass-cupped hinge that the slide (from which the struts to the ribs radiate out) is pushed above and thence the whole cover can be pivoted to accommodate the angle of the sun.

— 3 years ago with 4 notes
#parasol  #parasols  #1850s  #1840s  #victorian  #fashion  #vintage fashion  #vintage  #accessory  #accessories 
When in doubt, post a doodle of a parasol. This one is one I’ve been working on restoring for a while now - an unusual little carriage parasol, ca. 1869. I keep saving up the money to buy the ribbed (expensive) taffeta to match the original silk, but every time I’m about to buy it - I somehow end up spending the money on something else. Harumph.
I worked on it a little today in fact, sanding the first coat of new period-correct - and slightly toxic lead-imbued flake white paint on the disassembled wooden handle. I still have some sanding to do on it yet before I’m happy with the even-ness of the first coat, but after a while, it should be ready for what should be a finish coat of flake white.
(I abhor refinishing, BTW, but in this case, a repair made it unavoidable, so I’m going to do this right - despite people looking at me with eight heads when I say I DON’T want to just polyurethane the handle and be done with it.)
Anyways - this little drawing is what the finished restoration SHOULD look like - basically identical to the original - down to the scalloped pinking on the edges of the cover panels. (I have a reproduction scalloped pinker - in the same width as the original pinking on the cover.) The pinking isn’t really visible here, as the remounted original Bedfordshire-Maltese bobbin lace, which is really beautiful, covers it up.
AAAAND also - my evening got taken up cleaning out the fridge. It was gross. And a lot of work. Now to just flollop on the couch a little.

When in doubt, post a doodle of a parasol. This one is one I’ve been working on restoring for a while now - an unusual little carriage parasol, ca. 1869. I keep saving up the money to buy the ribbed (expensive) taffeta to match the original silk, but every time I’m about to buy it - I somehow end up spending the money on something else. Harumph.

I worked on it a little today in fact, sanding the first coat of new period-correct - and slightly toxic lead-imbued flake white paint on the disassembled wooden handle. I still have some sanding to do on it yet before I’m happy with the even-ness of the first coat, but after a while, it should be ready for what should be a finish coat of flake white.

(I abhor refinishing, BTW, but in this case, a repair made it unavoidable, so I’m going to do this right - despite people looking at me with eight heads when I say I DON’T want to just polyurethane the handle and be done with it.)

Anyways - this little drawing is what the finished restoration SHOULD look like - basically identical to the original - down to the scalloped pinking on the edges of the cover panels. (I have a reproduction scalloped pinker - in the same width as the original pinking on the cover.) The pinking isn’t really visible here, as the remounted original Bedfordshire-Maltese bobbin lace, which is really beautiful, covers it up.

AAAAND also - my evening got taken up cleaning out the fridge. It was gross. And a lot of work. Now to just flollop on the couch a little.

— 3 years ago with 2 notes
#parasol  #sketch  #doodle  #drawing  #accessory  #fashion  #1869  #pencil  #graphite  #victorian