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Central Floridian - photographer, illustrator, and (occasionally) very bad writer. This blog is mostly for my drawings and non-photographic-related creative-ish stuff.



Eugen Kirchner, November
Pan, 1896.
Aquatint.


I checked out an old favorite library book today, and this image was in it - ever since I first set my eyes on it nearly ten years ago, it’s been a favorite of mine.

Eugen Kirchner, November

Pan, 1896.

Aquatint.

I checked out an old favorite library book today, and this image was in it - ever since I first set my eyes on it nearly ten years ago, it’s been a favorite of mine.

— 3 years ago with 10 notes
#Eugen Kirchner  #Kirchner  #art nouveau  #graphic design  #graphic  #aquatint  #1896  #art  #illustration  #design 
I made a box as one of the finishing touches for the restoration of J & H Tracy parasol. I had a few photos of original nineteenth-century parasol boxes to use as reference (Alas, I’ve only seen three or four in the four or five years I’ve researched, their survival rate is vanishingly small.) and constructed the box using framing mat cardboard. After gluing the pieces together, the edges and corners were finished with strips of paper, to give it a neat, completed appearance. I lined the interior with pale pink tissue paper (it’s not really visible here, unfortunately.) as a nod to the pale-colored papers that became popular towards the end of the 1860s. 
I also used that Jay’s label I posted a while back.  I had to change the street numbers as they weren’t correct for the store for the period the parasol was made, and I had to correct a silly punctuation mistake I made.

I made a box as one of the finishing touches for the restoration of J & H Tracy parasol. I had a few photos of original nineteenth-century parasol boxes to use as reference (Alas, I’ve only seen three or four in the four or five years I’ve researched, their survival rate is vanishingly small.) and constructed the box using framing mat cardboard. After gluing the pieces together, the edges and corners were finished with strips of paper, to give it a neat, completed appearance. I lined the interior with pale pink tissue paper (it’s not really visible here, unfortunately.) as a nod to the pale-colored papers that became popular towards the end of the 1860s. 

I also used that Jay’s label I posted a while back.  I had to change the street numbers as they weren’t correct for the store for the period the parasol was made, and I had to correct a silly punctuation mistake I made.

— 3 years ago with 7 notes
#1869-1873  #Accessory  #J & H Tracy  #Parasol  #antique  #box  #graphic design  #label  #vintage  #restoration  #parasol restoration 
iconoclassic:

Erk Nitsche Illustration, 1961 (by sandiv999)

Normally, I don’t reblog anything on the radar, as I find 99% of the stuff I see on it uninteresting, (how many things with antlers and pictures of women in sun-glare does this world really need?) but my Dad works for General Dynamics, so I think this is rather cool, and he might think the same as well.
So weird how they’ve not even really changed the font they use for their letterhead.

iconoclassic:

Erk Nitsche Illustration, 1961 (by sandiv999)

Normally, I don’t reblog anything on the radar, as I find 99% of the stuff I see on it uninteresting, (how many things with antlers and pictures of women in sun-glare does this world really need?) but my Dad works for General Dynamics, so I think this is rather cool, and he might think the same as well.

So weird how they’ve not even really changed the font they use for their letterhead.

— 3 years ago with 1144 notes
#General Dynamics  #1961  #graphic design  #midcentury  #design 

Afloat on the Ohio, by Reuben Gold Thwaites (1853-1913). Published 1897, by Way and Williams, Chicago, Illinois. Binding signed by unidentified artist: “C.Y.R.”

Okay okay, last one for now - I promise. But isn’t this one one of the most visually arresting things you’ve ever seen? It’s incredible - and has been a favorite ever since I found the Publishers’ Bindings Online galleries a couple years ago.

Afloat on the Ohio, by Reuben Gold Thwaites (1853-1913). Published 1897, by Way and Williams, Chicago, Illinois. Binding signed by unidentified artist: “C.Y.R.”

Okay okay, last one for now - I promise. But isn’t this one one of the most visually arresting things you’ve ever seen? It’s incredible - and has been a favorite ever since I found the Publishers’ Bindings Online galleries a couple years ago.

— 3 years ago with 4 notes
#1897  #Afloat on the Ohio  #Reuben Thwaites  #antique  #book  #book cover  #bookbinding  #graphic design  #illustration  #inspiration  #vintage  #inspiration